DJ Thrifty

What is your name and DJ name?

DJ Thrifty.

What is the name of your show? When is it on?

The name of the show is The Junk Joint Jukebox, on Thursday nights from 9pm to 11pm.

Please describe your show. What is its format?

My show takes place in a a junk joint in an abandoned mine shaft under Madrid, with a secret passage from KMRD to the junk joint, in which sirens (that I’m a little bit afraid of) and blind albino reindeer roam. I have the world’s largest jukebox, with every song in the world, so I have the ability to play any song.

What drew you to participate in KMRD?

I was originally encouraged by the DJs of The Nightjar to participate, since I had had public radio experience.

What is the appeal of doing a radio show? How does it fit into the rest of your life?

It feels good to give back to the community once a week, and share music that has influenced my week or is pertinent to the global condition. 

It gives me the ability to share all the new music that I load in the junk joint jukebox from the thrift stores around the world.

What difference has being a DJ made in your life?

It’s continued to expose me to more music and keep an open mind with new music and all genres of music.

What are your hopes for your show?

I hope to be able to have a global dance party every week, with positive vibes for the whole world.

What are your hopes for the station?

I hope the station lasts longer than I live, and continues to be the bright light in the south Santa Fe County (and the world, via the internet). 

DJ L Boogie Woogie // Elle LaGuardia

What is your name and DJ name?

My name is Elle LaGuardia, and my DJ name is DJ L Boogie Woogie.

What is the name of your show? When is it on?

My show is Moonday Medleys: The Moon at Six, formerly known as The Moon at Noon.

Please describe your show. What is its format?

Usually what I tend to do is pick a theme, and that usually kind of gets the whole flow of the show going. I will pick anything from a color to a fruit to a subject, and I tend to flow my show around that. What I like about picking a subject is that it helps me kind of get a flow, but get comfortable using different genres. 

What drew you to participate in KMRD?

I was having a difficult transition in life and I needed an outlet. Being a radio DJ here and volunteering for our radio station was something I had thought about for a few years, and it was actually a really difficult time in my life that drew me to come here and take on a new hobby. I am so grateful to have this medium in my life and I truly enjoy it, and I cherish it. I’m grateful to have KMRD and it helped me through a difficult time in my life. And I would recommend it to anybody who is having a hard time.

What is the appeal of doing a radio show? How does it fit into the rest of your life?

One of my favorite things about being a radio DJ is introducing myself to so many new songs. That is so fun for me – in the past two years, almost, as a DJ, I have introduced myself to hundreds of new songs that I would have never heard if I wasn’t taking time to research my shows. Just researching a show and putting it together forces you to sit down and explore music, which is pretty amazing. And I wouldn’t be doing so if I wasn’t a DJ.

What difference has being a DJ made in your life?

For me, it’s actually an art form. It’s a medium for me, it’s my artistic outlet, and it may not be visual but it allows me to express myself in another way, which I absolutely love. Moonday Medleys is my schedule. I look forward to sitting down and creating my show on Sunday, and I wake up on Mondays and I get excited. I may not be sitting down with a canvas, but I am creating a canvas, and I’m sharing it with the community, which is pretty awesome. 

It’s really nice to be able to have a voice in the community as well. Being able to express something that you’re feeling. For example, doing my suicide awareness show was super important to me. It felt really great to have a way to share that with my community, of something that I was feeling and I wanted to share, that I thought might help one listener. And that felt really huge to have the opportunity to do that.

What are your hopes for your show?

My hopes are to continue to have something to look forward to, week to week. It’s truly something that’s in my agenda that I look forward to, when there’s so many things in my agenda that I do not look forward to. My hopes are just to keep me uplifted as a DJ and to keep me excited and to keep me open-minded and continuing to discover new music. And being able to share my discoveries with all the listeners – I mean, that’s what excites me. It’s like at least one song a show I find gold – and I’m like, “Oh my god, I need everybody to hear this song!” So my hope is that when I put on that golden song, I hope everyone’s listening. Being able to take my personal time to discover really beautiful music, and then being able to share it with the listeners.

What are your hopes for the station?

I want us to live on forever and ever, of course!

My hope for the station is that we continue to receive the donations to be able to stay afloat, without struggle. 

To continue to be this beautiful KMRD community that we are. To continue our gatherings, and our fundraisers, and our amazing little family parties. It does feel like a family. The Christmas parties are so amazing, and they make me feel included. I hope to see it continue. I hope to never see an end. It’s really a beautiful amazing special unique thing, that KMRD offers to our community. And community’s really important. So to have something like this, I just never want to see it die. It’s really special to be part of something so unique. In order to continue being part of it, I want to see the success of the station and we rely on our supporters for that. So I just hope to continue our support, and I hope our support grows.

Dream Queen // Jada White

What is your name? DJ name?

My name is Jada White and my DJ name is Dream Queen.

What is the name of your show and when is it on?

It is called “In the Cab with Dream Queen” and it is on Saturdays 8 to 9am.

Please describe your show. What is its format?

Stream of consciousness, really. I think of it often as a mixtape for myself and my people that listen – like I’m putting together a mixtape every week. Sometimes I’m influenced by current events and other times it’s just to get people moving, get myself moving in the morning.

What drew you to participate in KMRD?

I’ve always loved music and radio, and I just really appreciate the endeavors and the success of KMRD. It’s great programming, great people, and it’s a way for me to get creative, spread my toes out a little bit here.

What is the appeal of doing a radio show? How does it fit into the rest of your life?

I wrestle with the idea that, am I just stroking my ego? Just talking to the air? And then I think, I hope that nobody’s listening, so it can’t be that much of an ego trip! Being a board op for so many years, and a musician and a writer, I guess I have wanted to be on the mic. So it fulfills that need – that creative outlet – that I can’t really do with my own music right now. I just let other artists speak for me. 

What difference has being a DJ made in your life?

I don’t get so much sleep! 

It’s made me feel like I’m filling some sort of purpose. I feel like I have a voice in a way that I hadn’t felt like I had a voice in the past few years, since I stopped writing. So it’s fulfilled that and I really enjoy getting comments that they loved my show, that it affected their mood in a positive way, that it made them think. Another DJ told me that she can hear that I have something to say, and I say it through the music, which just made me really feel like somebody got me. It’s always lyrics for me – of course it’s beat – but when somebody says “you’re trying to say something and I hear it in the songs you choose” it makes me feel affirmed, and it also makes me feel that I have things in common with folks that maybe I don’t see all the time. I have people listening that hadn’t heard my voice in years because we don’t talk on the phone. My mom is 1500 miles away, and my aunt same thing, and they’re like, “it’s just great to hear your voice.” That makes me feel good, it makes me feel connected. 

What are your hopes for your show?

That I just keep getting to be a better DJ. That I can find a way to say things and make people think and make a difference in the world in a consciousness way. I just hope that I can continue to find spoken word pieces or say things from my own mouth a little bit more. My music spot’s getting a little bit shorter, because I give myself a chance to rant a little bit… I want to do more meaningful expression. 

What are your hopes for the station?

I hope the station stays on the air forever. I hope that more people can be involved, that it keeps growing, that more people can listen on the internet. I just hope that we keep growing and people tune in more and more.

Thanks for rolling with me!

Jody Price

What is your name? DJ name?

Jody Price, and Jody!

What is the name of your show and when is it on?

“Music From Another Present Era,” Sundays noon to two. 

Please describe your show. What is its format?

I’m all over the map. I’m a big fan of the history of music so I do a lot of segments around older blues or older soul music, because I love that stuff. A lot of jazz, a lot of Americana, a little bit of everything.

What drew you to participate in KMRD?

One, the Rock and Roll Doctor [Jody’s wife.] – shocking, right?! Two, I’ve always been attracted to community radio and smaller stations and what they bring to a community and to an area and Amy’s been trying for years to get me to do a show someplace and I finally said, okay, let me try it out. It’s an absolute blast.

What is the appeal of doing a radio show? How does it fit into the rest of your life?

The appeal is one, I just love to turn people on to music. It’s just so much fun, and there’s just so much out there. Compared to what you get on commercial stations – even KBAC, which is ok – it’s still such a limited playlist and such a limited selection. There’s so much music out there. How do you get some of that out, how do you help turn people on to it and give musicians the ability to be heard? The first time I ever went down to New Orleans, I realized there’s people playing on the street that are better than anybody you’ve ever heard, and they can’t get a gig, except for being buskers on the street. And it makes you realize how vast of a universe music is. 

The second part of the question – one, being a musician. Two, just being a lover of music and it’s anothe rway I get to enjoy something that means so much to me.

What difference has being a DJ made in your life?

It’s being a part of this station. This station is such an important part of the community – and not just Madrid, but Madrid, Cerrillos, you can get it great out in El Dorado. That’s probably the most important thing for me, being a part of the community and being a part of something that means a lot to a lot of people. It’s supported by such a small community – even if you go to the outlying areas it’s still a pretty small population – just how important it is to everybody.

What are your hopes for your show?

Just to keep growing and keep finding new music to listen to and to play. In all honesty, just to keep it going. I don’t really think about it as what’s next… it’s become a part of my life, and the friends that I’ve met because if it and the other DJs and the community and folks who’ve created the station – I just want to stay part of it. 

What are your hopes for the station?

I hope we keep getting funded, I hope we get a way to make more money so certain people involved can maybe find a way to get paid a little bit. The amount of work that it takes to keep this thing going, it’s not just “let’s put a couple of mics in, a couple of CD players, an antenna and keep going,” it’s paying the rent, paying the utilities, it’s keeping support within the community, keeping it pertinent and relevant so that people continue to want it to be part of their life. 

It’s a wonderful thing, it’s a wonderful station, it’s a wonderful addition. 

Lightnin’ Rod & Aunt Tenna // Dennis & Denise

What are your names and DJ names?

LR: Dennis Socrates Pettas. Lightnin’ Rod.

AT: Denise Lord Pettas, and I’m Aunt Tenna!

What is the name of your show, and when is it on?

AT: We are the Tower of Song, and it’s on Tuesday mornings, 11 to 2pm.

Please describe your show. What is its format?

LR: Well first of all, Denise, I have never decided in my head if it’s The Tower of Song, or Tower of Song. I still don’t know. Describe our show? You know, remarkably, it’s stayed the course of what I originally wrote about it, and what I originally wrote about it is that it’s going to be an eclectic musical review that skipped around in different genres, mostly pop, folk, rock, jazz, and blues. And the impetus behind having that varied playlist is simply because I’ve always been an advocate, in everything I do, for diversity. I’m obsessed with inclusivity. 

What drew you to participate in KMRD?

AT: Back in New York, we listened to KMRD because we knew one of the DJs. We love music. We grew up in New York at a time with the leading FM station with great DJs that gave us a lot of information. Two of the DJs on the station happened to be our high school English teachers, they jumped from teaching high school to being DJs. We also grew up at a time where – if you were ten years old or older in 1963, you wanted to learn to play the guitar because the Beatles came out. So that’s what we did as teenagers: we played music on the radio, FM came out, concerts were aplenty. We’re both musicians, we love music, we grew up with great music at a great time with great DJs on the radio.

LR: There’s a Lou Reed line: “My life was changed by rock and roll.” Mine wasn’t. But my life was changed by pop music on an AM radio. I remember the month – it was January 1965 – when I started listening to AM radio, and that’s the dividing line between everything that came before in my life and everything that’s happened since. When I wasn’t in my bedroom with my radio on, it was strapped to the handlebars of my bicycle. It accompanied me everywhere I went. 

Before we moved to Madrid – sure, we listened to Caiti because that’s our daughter – but I immediately fell in love with Scott’s show (Skinny Al’s Blender) and Captain Schmetterling, and Hillbilly Phil, and of course, Ken Wolverton’s show. And I was now living in Manhattan, scheduling everything I did around those shows, around making sure I was home to hear them. And that was part of our process of even deciding to move here: I had to be near them, and I had to meet them. 

What is the appeal of doing a radio show? How does it fit into the rest of your lives?

LR: The appeal for me is to do something that I just always thought was impossible. If we stayed in New York, there would have been no way for me to start doing radio. When I learned about [KMRD] and what you were doing with Caiti and your friends here, I lost my shit. I can’t tell you enough what that meant to me – what it still does. That initial shock hasn’t gone away. I don’t care if there’s one person listening. If there’s nobody listening, I care very much. But if there’s at least one person listening, that’s all I need to feel like this is the biggest thrill in the world. That my voice is going over something, going into somebody’s room. The other perks were that, what a great way to become part of a new town and community, to be literally out there on an airwave, wow.

AT: I don’t have too much to add, that’s pretty good. That about says it. The best part is being part of a group, part of a community, and doing something musical.

LR: I have to add something! The other thing is really hokey, but really true. I’ve been making – what we called them in the 70s was mixtapes – for myself, and I had nobody to play them for. I did this into my adult life, obsessed with making music compilations that went on a journey. When Denise came into my life, she introduced something new to me. I’d never been on the road, I’d never left the five boroughs of New York. We took road trips, and for the first time in my life I had somebody to share my homemade CDs with. When we were gonna move to Madrid, I was thinking, well, we’re going to travel less because we’re moving to a place that we want to stay at most of the time. Now what am I going to do? Who am I going to make my tapes for? The radio seemed like, holy fuck, what a logical thing to do. It’s what I should have been probably doing since I was ten years old.

What difference has being DJs made in your lives?

AT: We’re retired, we’ve moved here, we’ve completely changed our lives around, and this just adds to it. This is such a big thrill, a plus, a pleasure.

LR: I’m a painter and a teacher. I worked in really corrupt schools with misguided unenlightened administrators, and the times dictated that the art of teaching die. And I wasn’t able to do any more the kind of creative teaching I used to do. I don’t miss teaching. But what I do miss is the creative outlet, and being on the radio is so funny – now that I’m not in a classroom… if somebody said to me, “How do you conduct your classroom?” and I’d say, “Oh, I conduct it like talk show radio. Now I’m in a situation where I’m doing a radio program and if somebody said to me “How do you conduct it?” – I conduct it like a teacher. 

AT: Music has always been so much a part of my life, so to be able to play it here… it keeps us in contact with some of our friends back East who are listening, we get phone calls from who knows where, and it’s very funny here, we’ll be talking and people hear our New York accents and go: oh, you’re Lightnin’ Rod and Aunt Tenna! It makes you feel like a superstar or something. It’s just great. It’s work we do together. It’s a big deal, I really enjoy it. I’ve become a ham in the last four years!

LR: It’s a big deal! I was in a band, and Denise wanted to be in it, and every time she’d show up, everybody would look at me and say, “Dennis, she doesn’t project her voice.” It was very hard to get you to overcome that shyness, to just turn up the volume.

AT: And then being in Theater of Death, and being here it’s like: where’s my spotlight, where’s my microphone?

LR: Now she’s the biggest ham in the world!

I gotta throw this in because I’ve always believed this: I think dead people hear your voice even quicker when it’s on the radio than when you’re thinking something in your room. I get to talk to dead people! I got to talk to John Prine two weeks ago and tell him how much I love him. I got to tell my dad repeatedly this last year a bunch of personal stuff. That’s a real part of the mix for me. 

What are your hopes for your show?

AT: What are your hopes, Dennis? Hope that we get here again next week to do it!

LR: Well, that really is the biggest hope, that we have the health and the means and the patience of the people around us – that we can continue doing the show. Why do I personally want to do the show? It’s the same reason why I made the tapes when I was ten, why I made the roadtrip tapes, why I first wanted to try going on the air – those first twelve nervous shows that we did – it’s always the same reason. I want to hear what it sounds like; the gestalt. I record it because I want to play it back and hear everything wrong with it. It’s the same reason why I paint on canvas. I need to program a whole bunch of shit into it, then get spontaneous, then look at it and say, “Where did I go wrong? I can’t wait to do the next one.” It’s such a fucking labor of love.

What are your hopes for the station?

AT: Everything that people want to happen for the station will happen, with the support of everybody. I’m amazed there’s sixty different shows on the radio – how many people are devoted to their shows, and bringing the toilet paper, cleaning the bathroom, spraying down everything so it’s all nice and antiseptic for everybody – just sharing things. I hope it continues and I don’t know that much how a radio station grows – this is all I know – so whatever it can blossom into, I hope it does. 

LR: I look at this kind of the way Ken Wolverton does – that was my attraction to him when I heard him talking on the air so often – he takes this so seriously. And he takes it as part of a much larger organism, as a vital part of an organism, as an ongoing organism. It’s a continuation of what Homer did when he began orally telling stories – I feel like this is a continuation of that. Sometimes you’ll see a government that will bring out the army tanks to flatten an art exhibition because the canvases are portraying Expressionist painting. The biggest threat to that is indivudality and expressionism. I see this – I see FM LP radio – as a part of that precious resistance to that ever-present threat of a fascist or communist regime suppressing individual expressionism. I find it to be just absolutely of  breathtaking importance, in that regard.

AT: This radio station is very important to the community, when you find out that people are listening. We’re listening to each other, people in the community are listening, and anything that brings people together is great. Just the support: what we’re doing for the listeners, and what the listeners are doing for us.